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Posts Tagged ‘Roubo’

Roubo Workbench – Bench Dogs

October 31, 2020 Leave a comment
<p class="has-text-align-left" value="<amp-fit-text layout="fixed-height" min-font-size="6" max-font-size="72" height="80">The tail vise (wagon vise) is of no use without providing something to clamp against. In this case the Bench Dog becomes the opposing force. Many people use round dowels and it certainly would make things easier wehn making and drilling holes for their placement but the design of these bench dogs is unique and it looks like a fun project. The challenge is making fourteen of them. Clearly this is when a production line is a great choice and using power tools will speed up the process. I followed the guide suggested by the Wood Whisperer and it only toolk a couple of hours to complete. The first step was making a model which is shown below.The tail vise (wagon vise) is of no use without providing something to clamp against. In this case the Bench Dog becomes the opposing force. Many people use round dowels and it certainly would make things easier wehn making and drilling holes for their placement but the design of these bench dogs is unique and it looks like a fun project. The challenge is making fourteen of them. Clearly this is when a production line is a great choice and using power tools will speed up the process. I followed the guide suggested by the Wood Whisperer and it only toolk a couple of hours to complete. The first step was making a model which is shown below.

Beginning with hand tools, I made the first dog to get the correct size and shape. Most of you know that the majority of my time is spent using hand tools, however I do have the option of power tools when it makes sense and with 14 pieces exactly the same making a jig and mass producing them is a better use of the little free time I have. I’ve probably used a router more on this bench project then the last 10 years in total and although it’s far from my most favorite tool, it handles this job well. Beginning with hand tools, I made the first dog to get the correct size and shape. It took a bit of time assembling my router table, mostly spent looking for the assembly manual (hidden carefully in the box with my routers.) Next I assembled a jig using pallet wood from the construction dumpster next door. The design is from the WoodWhisperer, and it took an hour to put the jig together and rout the final shape for all of the Bench Dogs. Notice that the router produces a rounded shape rather then the squared off shape I made by hand. No worries they work just fine.

Categories: Roubo

Roubo End Cap

October 5, 2019 2 comments

The end cap on the Roubo Bench creates anxiety for most bench builders, I’m no different and procrastination built a simple dovetail into a crescendo. Although cherry is a soft wood, its beautiful color led me to using it for accent parts (chop, cap, pins, etc.) putting aside my fears I spent a long time marking out the various mortises, holes and finally the dovetail. No pictures for the blog, just pure focus. A couple of hours later and it was complete.

Many of you used hand drills to auger the holes. I used my drill press and was very thankful for the accuracy. Glad to have this behind me its time to place the top on the base.

Categories: Roubo

Bench Top

July 27, 2019 Leave a comment

The hardest part about this bench is maneuvering the lumber. As more and more parts are pieced together it becomes heavier. I think the photos below tell the story.

Joint, plane glue, repeat.

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Categories: Roubo

Bell Forest Hardwoods

March 31, 2018 Leave a comment

Thinking about building a new workbench is a pastime for many woodworkers. It’s been on my mind for a few years and I have posted my thoughts a couple of times. In an attempt to spread the cost, last year I purchased hardware from Benchcrafted. This year the search for the perfect building materials began. Soft Maple, Hard Maple, Ash all come to mind; reading blogs and watching you tube there are many beautiful benches and thoughts on what’s best. There’s definitely no lack of opinion amongst woodworkers. The decision really came down to two factors, I prefer the look of maple, and soft maple is slightly easier to work. Since my tool cabinet and saw till are cherry the bench accents will also be cherry.

Two hardwood stores are within 45 minutes of my house and I’ve been to both over the last few years, they generally have what I need, but the pricing is very high. Shannon Rogers has frequently discussed lumber pricing and I am a huge believer in capitalism, if the prices I see are what the market will bare, so be it. Fortunately I travel a fair amount in my job and have been stopping at local lumber yards throughout the Midwest looking at alternatives while waiting for the weather to improve. A few weeks ago out of curiosity I had Bell Forest Products quote their Roubo Kit. My expectation was low that they would be competitive. Surprise, with shipping, straight line rip and Planing they were a few dollars cheaper!

The best part was yet to come…. Woodworker Guild Savings, and I happened to need to go to Northern Michigan University for a College Visit. Under the guise of touring colleges I ended up in Ishpeming Michigan. Exchanging a few emails with Eric at Bell Forest Products the deal was struck and date set for pick up.

I’ve read blogs and Instagram about the service and quality of the Lumber from Bell Forest Products and my skepticism faded long ago with the many comments. If any of you remain skeptics one visit and you will be sold. Over the last week Eric has sent a couple of emails updating me on my lumber status. The day before pickup he let me know it was there and waiting, pulling up and walking in the door I immediately felt welcome and comfortable. Given a choice I like to buy from people that I have met and build trust with. Mark Harrell at Bad Axe, Jason Thigpen at Texas Heritage Toolworks, all have built a reputation for quality service and I consider part of my woodworking family. I am certainly adding Eric Poirier and Bell Forest to this list.

Eric toured me around their shop and talked about their business, customer service and employees (there are eight). I was amazed that 90-95% of their business is through the internet and phone and is shipped across the country. We talked a lot about quality and expectations of customers. I think my daughter summed up the visit best “it’s really fun being around people who are passionate about what they do.” This is a direct quote.

A few photos of the lumber in their shop and the team packaging and getting shipments ready. It was a great visit and hopefully the first of many. If you are considering Bell Forest Products, don’t hesitate and if you can find an excuse to visit Northern Michigan it’s beautiful country with wonderful people. Eric, thanks for a great visit and I look forward to staying in touch.

Categories: Lumber, Roubo