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Posts Tagged ‘Techniques, Tools and Schools’

Shop Design

December 31, 2019 Leave a comment

Earlier this month I posted some thoughts on a new shop. Currently I do not have a final solution, but continue to lean towards a divided three car garage. It seems like the most economical solution and after discussions with a real estate agent would not affect resale of the property.

One of the great tools available for analyzing shop space is provided by Grizzly. At this point a disclaimer; I don’t own any Grizzly tools and I don’t personally know anyone that does. They do appear to be popular and I’ve seen very few negative reviews and would consider them in the future for upgrades to my exisitng tools. ┬áTake a few minutes and lay out your shop using the Grizzly Tools Shop Planner.

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Using the planner I laid out a single car garage (11′ x 22′) with an annex (6′ x 13′.) the diagram above is the output from the planner. Ceratinly there are tools included that I don’t own, but it does give a great idea about how the space would work including the essential shop dog.

 

 

Categories: Texas Shop

New Shop Thoughts

December 2, 2019 Leave a comment

Moving South has prompted thoughts of my future work space. Most of my woodworking has been done in the Midwest with a brief stint in the south. Considering the impacts of weather to both myself and the projects I build, temperature and humidity are of concern.

Projects have been built in a wide range of temperatures, the cart project pushed through a cold winter with a small heater struggling to pull the temperature above 30 degrees (fahrenheit for my European readers), the bed I built over 20 years ago was pursued in the Southern heat. Along with temperature, there is a large humidity change between Southern summers and Midwest winters. Like most of you I would rather not struggle through the temperature extremes and my tools would certainly prefer a consistent temperature.

A small shop in an outbuilding would be ideal, but that would take more property than most of us can afford so I’m considering walling off one section of a 3 car garage with a small addition. Shannon Rogers has made excellent use of a single car garage and certainly provides insight into how this space should be used. ATypical single car garage is 12′ x 22′, adequate space at 264 sq ft, however a small addition off to the side would make a large impact with minimal cost.

Placing a wall in the garage and ensuring it is insulated would allow heating and cooling without the risk of losing heat when the garage door is opened for a car! Or accidentally when coming home from a run. It also helps control dust and makes an air cleaner much more effective. The down side, your garage is smaller and would this be amenable for future homeowners?

Continuing the journey to find a new home and shop over the next several months I’ll share my thoughts and decisions hoping for feedback and suggestions from all of you.

 

Categories: Texas Shop

Roubo End Cap

October 5, 2019 Leave a comment

The end cap on the Roubo Bench creates anxiety for most bench builders, I’m no different and procrastination built a simple dovetail into a crescendo. Although cherry is a soft wood, its beautiful color led me to using it for accent parts (chop, cap, pins, etc.) putting aside my fears I spent a long time marking out the various mortises, holes and finally the dovetail. No pictures for the blog, just pure focus. A couple of hours later and it was complete.

Many of you used hand drills to auger the holes. I used my drill press and was very thankful for the accuracy. Glad to have this behind me its time to place the top on the base.

Categories: Roubo

Bench Top

July 27, 2019 Leave a comment

The hardest part about this bench is maneuvering the lumber. As more and more parts are pieced together it becomes heavier. I think the photos below tell the story.

Joint, plane glue, repeat.

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Categories: Roubo

Small Gift Box

June 23, 2019 Leave a comment

It’s been a while since dovetails were part of a project. However a small gift was needed so a small box was required. A piece of cherry left over from the cabinet would become the sides and Sapele left over from the small tool chest became the top and bottom.

Cutting the cherry board such that the grain continues around the box may not be apparent to everyone, but knowing where this box is going it was important to add in the small details. Several practice cuts and muscle memory took over as the dovetails were cut.

Work with a #4 plane smoothed the edges and cleaned up the dovetails. The top and bottom cut from the Sapele have edges rounded using the same #4 plane. The bottom is simply glued onto the sides and after a night in the clamps a quick sanding allowed the finish process to begin. The top has a couple of stops glued to the bottom the keep the top in place.

Next a quick sanding and I began applying Shellac. Several coats later and the box was complete.

Small Cabinet – Comedy of Errors

April 15, 2018 3 comments

You’ve got to laugh at yourself when things begin to go awry. It began this weekend with a miss cut pin. Not paying attention I cut on the inside of the line rather than the outside on the first pin. This would work great for tails but alas it was not a tail I sought. Instead of beginning again I realized it would be an easy fix after glue up and moved on. It’s always a fun challenge to hide your mistakes.

Not long after, I managed to cut pins in the wrong direction. This was an interesting mistake since at the time I was thinking about ensuring I avoided this error on the final board which is where it usually happens.

The final mistake of the day occurred when disassembling the boards. A couple of taps with the dead blow hammer and I split the board in half. I was actually chuckling to myself at this point as I put the boards into the scrap bin. Good time to clean the shop I think…..

Categories: Small Cabinet

Diamond Bits

April 6, 2018 Leave a comment

A few years ago I was given a set of Craftsman Diamond Tipped screw drivers for Christmas. Whenever I strip a screw head and struggle to remove a screw I’ve found them invaluable. Lately I don’t wait until I make a mess of a screw head and use them for installing hardware from the start.

Before Christmas I noticed that Lee Valley offers a set of diamond tipped driver bits. They magically appeared under the tree and I’ve used them ever since. If you have a driver these are perfect to pair with the likes of Blue Spruce or others. Yeah I’m dreaming a little, but for now the current driver seems to work fine.

Categories: Tools