Roubo Crubber and Weldwood

June 20, 2021 Leave a comment

Several months ago I installed the Crubber on my benchcrafted Vise. Carefully taping off the area I sprayed it with adhesive and stuck it in place. Two days later I peeled it off and started again! After a little research I realized that I need something stronger than contact adhesive and browsing my local Home Depot came across Weld Wood Contact Cement. Truth be know I was not looking for contact cement rather a paint brush and this little can was out of place and caught my eye.

Clearly a message from above and I purchased it and used it to reapply the Crubber.

After a few weeks it’s still there and working well. IF it fails I’ll let everyone know…..

Categories: Uncategorized

Gap Stops, and Puppies

June 9, 2021 Leave a comment

The day started early with what appeared to be a simple glue up with minor adjustments. Let no one think that the simplest of pieces take the least amount of time. The Roubo bench has many features that make it the most critical tool in a Hand Tool woodworkers shop. In the version I am building one of the features is the split top and subsequent gap stop. It’s another work holding device that I hope will become a useful tool.

Split Top Roubo Bench

Making the gap stop consists of gluing spacers between two pieces of lumber and fitting it into the gap. Nothing simpler, a great start to the day! It’s now one day later and it just fits, needs more adjustment and on top of that I’ve got a nice dent in the wall to repair….let me explain! Oh and I’ve not told anyone about the dent so let’s keep it quiet.

The Gap Stop consists of two boards, the length of the bench, approximately 1.5 inches wide. Spacers are used to glue the boards together providing a stop mid bench that can be used for planing against. The spacers also provide an area where tools can be placed so they don’t roll off the bench.

I cut the two outer boards and all of the spacers that would be needed. The two outer boards twisted magnificently and required a lot of work to get them close to flat. Then I checked my measurements and realized it was a little wider then I intended. Not to worry I planned to run it through through my planer. Next I check the actual gap between the two parts of the bench and realized that they were also a little wider then planned. So being In a hurry I clamped the boards to the table to prevent twist and glued everything up. Next morning I had a slightly twisted gap stop that wouldn’t fit in the gap. So I ran the gap stop through the planer. It only took two passes to begin showing a very strange variation in thickness.

Standing and staring at the stop for a minute I realized that the stop was flexing in the planer under the pressure from the guide rollers. I set them on the bench and hand planed them to fit.

A couple of thoughts that may help someone in the future. Make sure your boards have no twist, add a couple of additional spacers. Secure your work piece before planing, Be familiar with your tools and how they operate. Don’t assume the small stuff is easy! Enjoy the puppy picture!

Categories: Roubo

Sharpening Jig failure

June 6, 2021 4 comments

I sharpen planes and chisels both free hand and with a jig. There’s no rhyme or reason as to why I choose one method over the other , it just happens. Last week when I had 4 planes to sharpen I used a jig. They were in poor shape and I knew they would need extra effort.

The first three were sharpened with an Eclipse style jig. They are inexpensive and work well. I failed to notice that the wheel in the jig was not turning and managed to flatten it.

The final plane was sharpened by hand……..I imagine this is a very low cost part, but impossible to get. May have to reconsider my sharpening methods.

Plane Aid – Flattening and Sharpening

May 31, 2021 Leave a comment

Finished up the four planes this morning after using the 5th for parts. I hope that everyone is satisied with the results. The two Stanleys turned out to be a little more difficult than normal due to the blades not being particularly flat. I’ve never had that problem before but spent more time sharpening then has been typical. I also took the time to print out a couple of links that will hopefully help in the future showing the sharpening tools that I use etc.

After taking the #4 apart and repairing the front knob I disassembled and got all of the rust and gunk off the plane. Flattening the sole wasn’t a problem and I made sure that all of the bolts and frog were clean and fiunctioned correctly. The problem sarted with the blade which did not clean up easily and took quite a bit of elbow grease along with some 800 grit sand paper and wd-40. Once clean I sharpened it and noticed that the back was nowhere near flat. This may be why the ownwer had problems sharpening. Eventually I put it on a 400 grit stone and worked it flat. I’ve had blades that were concave in the middle but this had a side that put up a fight. I sued my basic sharpening system, diamond stones strop sand an eclipse style guide. Next I had to spend a little time with the cap iron making sure its leading edge fit snugly to the blade. All in all it is a nice plane and should be a great add to the tool chest.

The block plane is a craftsman with aluminum cap. I tidied it up flattened the sole and sharpened the blade. This took very little time and will make a great little plane. The small plane also took only a little work after getting the rust off. This was another plane where the high grit paper and wd-40 came in handy. Sometimes these tools have all kinds of spill on them and using a degreaser makes the difference

The final plane I worked on, fought me all the way and I think that it could still use a little polishing. There were two #5 planes in the box and after some thought I decided to use the newer plane for parts. I like the older style frogs. The handle from the plane was broken and although not too difficult to fix I did not have an old broken handle to source the rosewood from and felt that maple would be a poor choice. Thus I used the handle from the newer plane. The only downside being the use of a non brass screw to attach it. I placed all of the parts in a plastic bag so that the owner would have them for later repairs. The sole and blade needed quite a bit of work. Once cleaned and flat everything was sharpened and lubed. I also put quite a bit of wax on the sole and took it for a test run. Hopefully the owner is happy with the result.

Plane Aid

May 21, 2021 Leave a comment

Looking through the local San Antonio Woodworking Guild posts I noticed someone asking for a little help to bring a Plane back to life. The planes didn’t look too bad and I’ve been unable to settle into a project, so i stepped out of my comfort zone and offered to take a look. A few hours later and they were on my bench.

Looking through the planes there are two #5s, a corrugated #4, an unknown brand of Block Plane and a small plane. None of them are in terrible shape and only need a little TLC with the exception of one of the Totes. First job is to disassemble so I can go after the rust.

Getting the dirt and grime off took a few minutes with paper towels, a screw driver to scrape and a little WD-40. Next I took an oil drain pan and lined it with a garbage bag and used rust remover to take the rust off.

Categories: Uncategorized

Hanging Tool Cabinet Details

May 6, 2021 Leave a comment

Late 2016 early 2017 my cherry tool cabinet was put to work. There were several parts of the project incomplete and over the last few weeks I took time to make a few changes.

When I mounted the cabinet after moving the shop I noticed that one of the doors would not remain closed. The problem was that I never completed the installation! So 4 years later I ordered some magnets and installed them on the top of the doors.

When installing the shelves I did not account for the thickness of the chisel socks that I used to protect my tools from rust. This was always a problems for the doors. Moving the shelf stop up 1/2 an inch and adding some runners on the shelf to properly support each plane solved the problem and made storage much more secure. It took approximately an hour to complete the project. One project always leads to another and Since the doors wouldn’t open on their own I was forced to add the knobs that have been lying in the cabinet corner.

Next step was adding some chisel racks. I like the idea of having tools easily accessible so after a few measurements, screw drivers and chisels are neatly stored.

It’s really nice to have doors that remain shut and planes held carefully in place, perhaps I should finish projects more often!

Categories: Uncategorized

Firewood to Lumber

February 27, 2021 1 comment

A coworker shared some firewood with me a couple months back; while unloading it I noted that several of the pieces were very heavy. The wood appeared to be oak, but I wasn’t sure and after setting up my bandsaw the opportunity to take a peak arrived.

My first step was to build a sled that along with a couple of wedges would hold it upright and allow me to create one flat edge. As you can see the sled is nothing fancy, a few pieces of plywood screwed and glued together.

Setting up for the first cut I noticed that the piece had several cracks running vertically. I guessed that this may be indicating that it happened to be qtr sawn so that is how I placed it onto the sled for the first cut. As the bandsaw sliced away the rough surfaces, underneath was a beautiful piece of oak with some very nice medullary rays.

Cutting the wood into 3/4” thick pieces I was left with a several nice boards that will make a beautiful box. I think I may give it to my firewood suppler. You never know what is hidden away under the bark and rough exterior.

Categories: Uncategorized

Roubo Workbench – Bench Dogs

October 31, 2020 Leave a comment
<p class="has-text-align-left" value="<amp-fit-text layout="fixed-height" min-font-size="6" max-font-size="72" height="80">The tail vise (wagon vise) is of no use without providing something to clamp against. In this case the Bench Dog becomes the opposing force. Many people use round dowels and it certainly would make things easier wehn making and drilling holes for their placement but the design of these bench dogs is unique and it looks like a fun project. The challenge is making fourteen of them. Clearly this is when a production line is a great choice and using power tools will speed up the process. I followed the guide suggested by the Wood Whisperer and it only toolk a couple of hours to complete. The first step was making a model which is shown below.The tail vise (wagon vise) is of no use without providing something to clamp against. In this case the Bench Dog becomes the opposing force. Many people use round dowels and it certainly would make things easier wehn making and drilling holes for their placement but the design of these bench dogs is unique and it looks like a fun project. The challenge is making fourteen of them. Clearly this is when a production line is a great choice and using power tools will speed up the process. I followed the guide suggested by the Wood Whisperer and it only toolk a couple of hours to complete. The first step was making a model which is shown below.

Beginning with hand tools, I made the first dog to get the correct size and shape. Most of you know that the majority of my time is spent using hand tools, however I do have the option of power tools when it makes sense and with 14 pieces exactly the same making a jig and mass producing them is a better use of the little free time I have. I’ve probably used a router more on this bench project then the last 10 years in total and although it’s far from my most favorite tool, it handles this job well. Beginning with hand tools, I made the first dog to get the correct size and shape. It took a bit of time assembling my router table, mostly spent looking for the assembly manual (hidden carefully in the box with my routers.) Next I assembled a jig using pallet wood from the construction dumpster next door. The design is from the WoodWhisperer, and it took an hour to put the jig together and rout the final shape for all of the Bench Dogs. Notice that the router produces a rounded shape rather then the squared off shape I made by hand. No worries they work just fine.

Categories: Roubo

Roubo Bench Tail Vise

October 26, 2020 1 comment

A year of waiting to woodwork has produced one lone thought, where the heck was I. Looking at the bench I recall a frantic weekend to put together as much as possible and carefully pack the benchcrafted parts. However remembering the step I was about to take is in a recess of my mind. One thing is clear, I need to complete the tail vise or Front vise before moving forward.

After some contemplation I set to work on the tail vise. It appeared to be a quicker installation and I’ve yet to determine the shape of the chop on the front vise. It took time and some final adjustment, but I inserted the rails into mortises, adjusted the bolt holes and screwed it together.

Really happy to have the center punches to mark the holes. It’s one of those tools that aren’t essential but make a difference. I picked mine up at Lee Valley but I think you can get them most woodworking stores.

Some work the plane and saw and it’s all together.

Categories: Roubo

Shop Sign

October 17, 2020 Leave a comment

It has to be difficult finding a gift for most of us woodworkers. Several years ago my wife made a logo for my woodworking and it appears in various places such as the shop apron from Texas Heritage, Stickers and a T-shirt. This year she reached out across international borders to have a sign made.

Hanging above my small toolchest it adds an element of professionalism that was definitely lacking. The sign was made by

Categories: Texas Shop